Nine (More) Expats You’ll Meet Abroad

Victoria the Veteran Victoria has seen generations of expats come…and go. She’s been around long enough that she’s practically part of the furniture. She knows her way around, navigating not only the place, but the relationships that make up the place. Vic has ten different toes dipped in ten different circles–because she knows just how fleeting expat friendships can be. Some think she’s ice-cold because the constant goodbyes don’t seem to faze her, but it’s more that years on the scene have hardened her….just a little.

Freak-out Frannie. Frannie finds it hard to breathe deep and…relax, no matter how many hot yoga classes she signs up for. It doesn’t matter how smooth things seem to be going, there’s always cause for a freak-out. If it’s not the math curriculum, it’s the school lunches. Or something on the news. Or the cost of living. Or the way the traffic light doesn’t give you enough time to cross. The local propensity for liberally dropping the f-bomb into conversation sends her into convulsions. Her heart’s in the right place–it’s just always beating too fast, set to semi-permanent outrage mode.

Homesick Harriet  Harry gets monthly parcels sent from home, keeps up all her magazine instructions at exorbitant prices, and subscribes to whatever local cable package that lets her watch her favorite shows. She travels home at every given opportunity and brings food back in her luggage. She shops online–from stores in her own country. First-year Freyas are usually half-Harriet by default, but true Harriets never really embrace living abroad, they always have one foot where they’re living and another one firmly planted at home.

Traveling Tony It’s a stretch to call Tony an expat, as he’s usually not in town long enough to sleep in his own bed more than three nights in a row. Tony usually heads up family of ‘lifeboat expats’–women and children only–who stay behind in one place while he plies his trade all over the globe. Sometimes it’s hard for Tony’s spouse to convince others he actually exists. Perhaps those wedding photos you see when you go to their amazingly furnished house are just props after all?

Never-Going-Back Niamh. Niamh, like many expats, was skeptical at first, but took to expat life like a fish outta the Atlantic and relocated to the Pacific. So much so that Niamh never plans on going back home. Ever. In fact, Niamh will do anything, including moving internationally three times in a year, just to avoid it. Whether it’s the life, the opportunities, or the bonds, Niamh has embraced life as expat to the fullest extent and you’ll have to pry it out of her cold, dead hands.

Repatriating Rena–While Niamh settles in for a life of transient relocation, Rena is getting ready to move home and experiencing the nausea of the repatriation rollercoaster. Whether she’s been gone one year or ten, life outside has made her question what life will like back ‘inside’. Will she re-fit in? Will her kids be ok? Rena’s worries often gets lost in the two-step expat shuffle because people assume going home is easier….but as Rena worries, it may be anything but.

Pam the Polyglot A round in Russian? Да! A stint in Shang-hai? 好! A post in Paraguay? Si! Pam picks up the local language wherever she lands–and not just enough to order a coffee and a cup of the Bolshoi borscht. Pam can carry on conversations with the locals, understand and answer when folks stop her on the street, and get around by taxi no problem. Pam’s linguistic gymnastics often make her English-speaking compatriots feel guilty for not trying harder-the ones who rely solely on their mother tongue to get by without making much of an effort beyond nej, tak…

Superiority Complex Sam Sam never has a good word to say about the place she’s landed. Not one. Oh sure, there’s nothing an expat coffee klatch likes more than a little bitch about little annoyances and cultural quirks, but Sam’s insults take a much broader focus. There’s nothing about her adopted country that suits her, everything is better where she comes from.

Fay the Fantasy Fay is the expat we all aspire to be…and fail miserably at. The one who settles in with ease. Who speaks the language within months. Who has no trouble finding the expensive cheese she likes at the market in Uruguay that doesn’t even sell cheese. She travels extensively, her kids are involved in local sports programs, and she still Skypes her family back home twice a week. She takes every shock that a new culture sends up her spine with a smile and can pack up her family and move at the drop of a hat. With grace. Fay doesn’t really exist outside our collective expat imagination–but it doesn’t stop us from wanting to be her anyway.

Since I penned  Nine Expats You’ll Meet Abroad a few years ago, and watched it circulate the globe itself, I’ve cycled through a few more of these stages myself. And some of these as well…Nine Expats You’ll Meet in a Galaxy Far, Far Away. As for where I am now…well, it depends on any given day, really.

More importantly though, which expat are you?

 

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14 thoughts on “Nine (More) Expats You’ll Meet Abroad

    • Dina Honour May 17, 2017 / 5:41 pm

      At 5.5 years here in Denmark, I’m probably a solid Victoria at the moment….

      Liked by 1 person

      • ravenhawks magazine May 17, 2017 / 7:54 pm

        Yeah it all becomes very “normal” after the first couple of years.

        Like

  1. nina May 17, 2017 / 6:29 pm

    In Australia, I was Never-Going-Back Niamh!!! I miss Australia so much!!!!! Now in Germany, although I hate to admit it because I feel embarrassed and guilty at the same time, I’m Superiority Complex Sam :-/

    Like

    • Dina Honour May 17, 2017 / 7:53 pm

      Say it isn’t so! Too many rules in Germany? How long have you been there?

      Like

      • nina May 17, 2017 / 8:52 pm

        Haha, I wish it wasn’t’ true. Actually, the rules are not a problem. What I don’t like are the micro-aggressions (e.g. people evidently avoiding to sit with me on the train, getting a different treatment when I go shopping to a nice place, assumptions about my background or level of education, etc.) and being continuously stereotyped, even by nice people. I’ve only been here for a year but I’ll be heading home soon.

        Like

    • Dina Honour May 17, 2017 / 9:41 pm

      Oh wow–bizarre with the Homesick one–I almost used Helen, but I know so many Helens IRL I didn’t want to risk it. So…question is…are were really all that interchangeable and predictable (in the original piece I wrote a few years ago your Veteran Vincent was my Greta the Go to Guru!) or, are our collective experiences just similar enough to make our lives recognizable? Fodder for another post?

      Liked by 1 person

  2. oregongirlaroundtheworld May 17, 2017 / 10:45 pm

    Nailed it. Igen. Good work sister. Met them. Love them. Hate them. Am them. Embrace them. Engage them. Try very hard. To understand them. All of them. Great post – love it!

    Like

    • Dina Honour May 22, 2017 / 7:57 pm

      Thanks. I’ve been most if not all on any given Sunday. Life as an expat can be schizophrenic like that!

      Liked by 1 person

  3. CherryJustLikeTheFruit May 17, 2017 / 11:41 pm

    So what is my (new) name? 😛

    Like

  4. Barry May 20, 2017 / 8:03 pm

    Looking forward to meeting all of these folks in a couple weeks when we move our family to Switzerland for a year. Great post!

    Like

    • Dina Honour May 22, 2017 / 7:55 pm

      Oh, good luck and enjoy! If you know you’re only there for a year, make the most of it. Travel every weekend if you can, and throw yourself in headlong. It can be addictive, so watch out!

      Liked by 1 person

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